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Genealogy Resources

World Genealogy

Canada

  • 1911 Census of Canada Indexing Project. This is an index to every name enumerated in the 1911 Census of Canada with the personal data transcribed, links to images of the original census pages, and links to other records for individuals including: census records from other years, birth, marriage, death, and other records.
     
  • 1901 Census of Canada Indexing Project. This is an index to every name enumerated in the 1901 Census of Canada with the personal data transcribed, links to images of the original census pages, and links to other records for individuals including: census records from other years, birth, marriage, death, and other records.

  • Ancestry.ca  The largest collection of Canadian family history records in the world. There are 150 million names on the database from 1592 to 2002. Free trial available. $
     
  • Archives of Ontario.
     
  • The Atlas of Canada - Discover Canada Through Maps and Facts.
     
  • Automated Genealogy. Indexes of the Canadian Censuses of 1911 and 1901, the 1906 census, and the 1871 census of Kings County, New Brunswick. Automated Genealogy has made public the "linking projects" of the Halifax Explosion, the Soldiers of the First World War, the Canadian Virtual War Memorial Project, the Dictionary of Canadian Biography Project, and the British Home Children Linking Project.

  • Baker, Eunice Ruiter. Searching for Your Ancestors in Canada. Ottawa, Ontario: Heritage House, 1974.

  • Baxter, Angus. In Search of Your Canadian Roots. Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1994.

  • Baxter, Angus. In Search of Your Roots: A Guide for Canadians Seeking their Ancestors.  Toronto, Ontario: Macmillan of Canada, 1984.
     
  • British Columbia Archival Information Network. This site is a portal to the largest and most comprehensive collection of historic photographs for all of British Columbia, and identifies and links dozens of websites with photographic images online.

  • British Columbia Birth Registrations, 1854-1903 - These are birth registrations, delayed birth registrations, and delayed registrations of Indian births. FamilySearch.

  • British Columbia Death Registrations, 1872-1986 - These are death registrations including overseas casualties, delayed death registrations, and delayed registrations of Indian deaths. FamilySearch.
     
  • British Columbia Genealogical Society. Links to Genealogical and Historical Web Sites. Canadian and world genealogy sites.

  • British Columbia Marriage Registrations, 1859-1932 - These are marriage registrations from British Columbia Vital Statistics, and microfilm at the Family History Library. FamilySearch.
     
  • British Columbia Vital Statistics Agency Website. Here you will find information to help you register and order certificates for vital events, such as a birth, death or marriage. This website also includes specific information and annual reports on the vital events and the health of British Columbians.

  • Campey, Lucille H. After the Hector: The Scottish Pioneers of Nova Scotia and Cape Breton, 1773-1852. Toronto: Natural Heritage Books, 2007. The arrival of the 'Hector' in 1773, with nearly 200 Scottish passengers, sparked a huge influx of Scots to Nova Scotia and Cape Breton. This title offers a documented and detailed account of one of the greatest early migrations of Scots to North America.
     
  • Can Genealogy.  Guide to the best sources for genealogy research in Canada.

  • Canada Births and Baptisms, 1661-1959 - Name index to birth and baptism records from Canada. Microfilm copies of these records are available at the Family History Library and Family History Centers. FamilySearch.

  • Canada Census Mortality Schedules, 1871 - Index and images of mortality schedules for the provinces of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia , Ontario, and Quebec. FamilySearch.

  • Canada Deaths and Burials, 1664-1955 - Name index to death and burial records from Canada. Microfilm copies of these records are available at the Family History Library and Family History Centers. FamilySearch.

  • Canada Gazette. Often referred to as "the official newspaper of the Government of Canada," the Canada Gazette has been an important instrument in the Canadian democratic process for more than 160 years. The database comprises images taken from microfilm, microfiche and rare original copies of the Gazette held by Library and Archives Canada.

  • Canada Marriages, 1661-1949 - Digitized Name index to marriages from Canada. Microfilm copies of these records are available at the Family History Library and Family History Centers. FamilySearch.
     
  • Canadian Corner. Genealogy Today site that highlights Canadian resources and provides helpful articles on Canadian genealogy topics and news events.
     
  • Canadian Genealogy & History Links. A listing of genealogical and historical web sites from East to Western Sea. The site is divided into national and provincial sections.
     
  • Canadian Genealogy Centre. Library and Archives Canada, a result of the combination of the National Library of Canada and the National Archives of Canada. It is the country's largest repository of the nation's history Census and immigration records are the most popular databases.
     
  • Canadian Geographical Names
     
  • Canadian Immigrant Experience. Whether they came from overseas or from the North American continent, immigrants to Canada had to overcome numerous challenges and obstacles before establishing a foothold on Canadian soil. A variety of documents -- from the advertisements that encouraged them to make a new life in a new land, to the land grants that were offered to them upon their arrival -- created a trail that followed immigrants throughout their tumultuous voyage. The content of these documents reveals much about past events, but what is the nature, history and role of these items? In this section you will find all of this information and more about selected documents created during the Canadian immigration process.
     
  • Canadian Naturalization. The Canadian Naturalization databases contain references to about 200,000 people who applied for and received status as naturalized Canadians from 1915 to 1932. During that period, the Government of Canada published the lists of names of those naturalized subjects in the annual reports of the Secretary of State (Sessional Papers) and in the Canada Gazette. These two databases, produced by the Jewish Genealogical Societies of Montreal and Ottawa, make it possible to search those annual lists by name.
     
  • Canadian Passenger & Immigration Records, 18th, 19th & early 20th Centuries
     
  • Canadian Ships Passenger Lists.  Olive Tree Genealogy.
     
  • Census of Canada, 1851, of Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.
     
  • Census of Canada, 1901. The 1901 Census offers a rich source of information about Canada and Canadians at the turn of the 20th Century. Through this research tool you can access digitized images of the original census returns, which record age, nationality, religion, profession, income, education, etc for every single resident of Canada on 31 March 1901.
     
  • Le Centre De Genealogie. (The Centre of Genealogy). In French. There are lists of genealogy clubs in Quebec and in other French-Canadian communities, and history societies in Quebec. There are also links to family associations and family pages, which are in French and English.
     
  • Citizenship and Immigration Canada.
     
  • Dawson, Samuel Edward. The Saint Lawrence (Canada) -- Its Basin and Border-Lands. Heritage Books, 1905, reprint. Pertains to the discovery and exploration of the northeastern part of the continent of North America.
     
  • Department of the Secretary of State of Canada. The Canadian Style: A Guide to Writing and Editing. Toronto: Dundurn Press, 1985.
     
  • Discover Canada through National Maps and Facts. This online atlas offers a collection of maps and related information about Canada. Select and view over 900 maps dating back to 1906.
     
  • Family History Library. Research Outline: Canada. Rev. edition. Salt Lake City: Family History Department, 1993.
     
  • FamilySearch.org. Besides having Canadian entries on the International Genealogical Index (IGI), it has the 1881 Canadian Census free for researching.
     
  • Fellows, Robert F. Researching Your Ancestors in New Brunswick, Canada. Fredericton: Provincial Archives, 1979.
     
  • FrancoGene. A French/English site known as "Your gateway to Franco-American and French-Canadian Genealogy on the Internet".
  • Genealogy Canada. A frequently updated site/blog for genealogy resources and links for Canadian ancestors.
     
  • Genealogy Research Library. Founded by Noel Elliott. Index to data source documentation. The website contains information on 15 million Canadian ancestors. This databank includes people who lived between the years 1600 and 1900+ in every province and territory of Canada. Source documents are online for about 1 million of these ancestors.
     
  • Hansen, Marcus and John Brebner. The Mingling of the Canadian and American Peoples. New Haven, Connecticut: Yale University Press, 1940.
     
  • Hillman, Thomas A. Catalogue of Census Returns on Microfilm: Catalogue de recensements sur microfilm, 1666-1891. Ottawa: Public Archives of Canada, 1987.
     
  • Hillman, Thomas A. Catalogue of Census Returns on Microfilm, 1901. Ottawa: National Archives of Canada, 1992.
     
  • Home Children. Between 1869 and the late 1930s, over 100,000 juvenile migrants were sent to Canada from Great Britain during the child emigration movement. Motivated by social and economic forces, churches and philanthropic organizations sent orphaned, abandoned and pauper children to Canada. Many believed that these children would have a better chance for a healthy, moral life in rural Canada, where families welcomed them as a source of cheap farm labour and domestic help. After arriving by ship, the children were sent to distributing homes, such as Fairknowe in Brockville, and then sent on to farmers in the area. Although many of the children were poorly treated and abused, others experienced a better life here than if they had remained in the urban slums of England. Many served with the Canadian and British Forces during both World Wars.

  • Home Children (The Middlemore Children). (1873-1933) The British Isle Family History Society of Great Ottawa and the Library and Archives Canada. BIFHSGO has chosen to place a special emphasis on Canada's home children. This is because of the Society's accessibility to the ship and military records at Library and Archives Canada, and to the records of the Family History Centre of Ottawa (Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints) which include its excellent Ontario civil registrations. No other place in Canada has such ready access to these vital research tools, particularly important considering that 70% of Canada's home children were settled in Ontario.
     
  • Immigration to Canada 1925 - 1935. The National Archives of Canada holds passenger lists from 1865 to 1935 (Record Group 76, C 1). These lists constitute the official record of immigration to Canada in that period. A series of old nominal indexes exist for the period 1925 to 1935. They provide the volumes and page numbers on which the names of Canadian immigrants appear in the passenger lists. In cooperation with the National Archives of Canada, the Pier 21 Society in Halifax, Nova Scotia, has input the information from the passenger list indexes into this database.
  • Immigrants at Grosse-Île. This database includes information on 33,026 immigrants whose names appear in surviving records of the Grosse-Île Quarantine Station between 1832 and 1937. Parks Canada provided the data. In the 1830s, an average of 30,000 immigrants arrived in Quebec City, the main port of entry in Canada. Of these, approximately two-thirds were from Ireland. To help prevent the spread of diseases, which were prevalent in the 1800s, a quarantine station was established on Grosse-Ile, and island in the middle of the St. Lawrence River near Quebec City, and it was opened from 1832 to 1937. A total of over 35,000 immigrants who passed through Grosse-Ile or died there have been recorded.
     
  • Immigrants from the Russian Empire (LI-RA-MA Collection). A database of Jewish, Ukrainian, and Finnish immigrants who came to Canada from the Russian Empire between 1898 and 1922, of which the records were compiled by the consular offices of the Russian Empire in Canada.
     
  • Index to the 1906 Census of the Northwest Provinces.
     
  • inGeneas. The inGeneas Database offers you an extensive array of the following: Canadian passenger, Canadian immigration, Canadian census, Canadian vital statistic, Canadian land, Canadian military and Canadian miscellaneous records from the mid-1700s to the early 1900s.

  • Irvine, Sherry and Dave Obee. Finding Your Canadian Ancestors: A Beginner's Guide. Provo, Utah: Ancestry Publishing, 2007. Covers a wide array of topics, including the Library and Archives Canada, Canadian geography, immigration, census records, vital records created by both governments and churches, cemetery, probate, military and land records, the Aboriginals, the Acadians, the Loyalists, the Canadian provinces and research fundamentals.
     
  • Jetté, René. Dictionnaire Généalogique ds Familles Québécoises, des Origines à 1730. Les Presse de l'Université de Montréal, 1983, Montéal, Québec. Genealogical dictionary.
     
  • Jonasson, Eric. The Canadian Genealogical Handbook. [S.l.], Wheatfield Press, 1978.

  • Larson, Denise R. French-Canadian Genealogy Research. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2011. French-Canadian genealogical research has never been so easy. In just four laminated pages, Denise R. Larson, author of the best-selling Companions of Champlain: Founding Families of Quebec,1608-1635, lays out the basic elements of French-Canadian research, boiling the subject down to its essence and allowing you to grasp the fundamentals of French-Canadian research at a glance.
     
  • Library and Archives Canada. This website has been designed to provide optimal access to Library and Archives Canada resources for both the experienced researcher and the general user.
     
  • Mary's Genealogy Treasures. This site is primarily for Canadian researches, but there is a large amount of material for U.S. genealogists. For each province there are lists of archives, vital and cemetery records, census and church records, court records, database links, directories, ethnic groups, government, history and more.
     
  • Merriman, Brenda Dougall. Genealogy in Ontario: Searching the Records. 3d edition. Toronto: Ontario Genealogical Society, 1996.
     
  • Merriman, Brenda Dougall. United Empire Loyalists: A Guide to Tracing Loyalist Ancestors in Upper Canada. Campbellville, Ontario: Global Heritage Press, Inc., 2006.
     
  • Montreal Emigrant Society Passage Book (1832). Organizations such as the Montreal Emigrant Society were founded to help immigrants. This research tool provides access to 1,945 references to people who received aid from the Montreal Emigrant Society between May 12 and November 5, 1832.
     
  • Moore, Christopher. The Loyalists: Revolution, Exile, Settlement; 1984.
     
  • Nanaimo Family History Society of British Columbia. Is indexing passenger names of people who arrived in Halifax and Quebec from 1900 to 1921. It includes returning Canadians, tourists, passengers destined to the United States, and people whose names have been crossed out. The indexed list is divided into sections, including surname, given name(s), date of the arrival of the ship, the name of the ship, the name of the port, the country of birth, the page number where the record is found, the number of the microfilm as shown in the Library and Archives Canada files, and a column for notes which the transcriber felt needed to be included.

  • New Brunswick Births and Baptisms, 1819-1899 - Index to selected New Brunswick births and baptisms. Only a few localities are included and the time period varies by locality. FamilySearch.

  • New Brunswick, Death Certificates, 1920-1934 - Browsable Images of death certificates from the Provincial Archives of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. FamilySearch.

  • New Brunswick, Death Certificates, 1935-1938 - Browsable Images of death certificates from the Provincial Archives of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. FamilySearch.

  • New Brunswick Provincial Deaths, 1815-1938 - Index and Images of death records. FamilySearch.

  • New Brunswick, Provincial Returns of Births and Late Registrations, 1810-1906 - Index and images of provincial returns of births, 1869-1905, and 1906 (only surnames beginning with letters A-Be); and also late registrations, 1810-1905. FamilySearch.

  • New Brunswick, Provincial Returns of Deaths, 1815-1919 - Browsable Images of Provincial Returns of Deaths from the Provincial Archives of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. FamilySearch.

  • Newfoundland, Vital Records, 1840-1949 - Browsable images of births, delayed registrations of births, marriages, and deaths initially from the Provincial Archives of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland. FamilySearch.
     
  • Newfoundland, Vital Statistics, 1753-1893 - Browsable Images of church record transcripts. Contains baptisms, marriages, and some burials from many churches in the province. FamilySearch.

  • Nova Scotia Antigonish Catholic Diocese 1823-1905- Index & data abstract to the Nova Scotia Antigonish Catholic Diocese - The Roman Catholic Diocese of Antigonish was originally known as the Diocese of Arichat and was established on September 22, 1844. Previously the diocese was part of the Diocese of Quebec. On August 23, 1886, the see was moved from Arichat to the town of Antigonish, and the diocese became the Diocese of Antigonish. The diocese covers seven counties in northeastern Nova Scotia: Richmond, Inverness, Victoria, Cape Breton, Antigonish, Pictou and Guysborough. Catholic records are traditionally kept on the parish level so the registers are usually found at the church where the event occurred. - This is a partner project with the Genealogical Association of Nova Scotia to index digital-born images for this Catholic diocese. The images contain church records for some, but not all parishes in the diocese and include christenings, marriages and births. The data from this project will be used for family reconstruction prototype projects at GSU and shared with GANS. The original records are housed at Diocese of Antigonish, Antigonish, Nova Scotia. FamilySearch.

  • Nova Scotia Births and Baptisms, 1702-1896- Index to selected Nova Scotia births and baptisms. Only a few localities are included and the time period varies by locality. FamilySearch.
     
  • Nova Scotia Historical Newspapers. Presented in chronological order, are front-page images for seven different newspapers published in four very different Nova Scotia communities over a span of 210 years — from The Nova Scotia Chronicle and Weekly Advertiser in 1769, to The 4th Estate in 1977. Click on each image to begin exploring the surviving issues for that newspaper, for the years indicated — 14,377 digitized pages in all.

  • Nova Scotia Historical Vital Records. The records include one million names found in birth records from 1864 to 1877, marriages from 1864 to 1930, and death records from 1864 to 1877 and 1908 to 1955.

  • Nova Scotia Marriages, 1711-1909 - Index to selected Nova Scotia marriages. Only a few localities are included and the time period varies by locality. FamilySearch.

  • Obee, Dave, and Dave Obee. Destination Canada: A Genealogical Guide to Immigration Records. Victoria, B.C.: D. Obee, 2010.

  • Oliver, Reginald L. Your Ancient Canadian Family Ties.  Logan, Utah: Everton Publishers, 1972.

  • Ontario Births, 1869-1912 - Index to birth records. FamilySearch.

  • Ontario Births and Baptisms, 1779-1899 - Index to selected Ontario births and baptisms. Only a few localities are included and the time period varies by locality. FamilySearch.
     
  • Ontario Cemetery Finding Aid. This database is intended as a "pointer" database only. It consists of the surnames, given names, cemetery name and location of more than two million interments in Ontario and one county in the province of Quebec. The file does not contain transcriptions or dates, but it does tell the researcher which county, township and cemetery contains a given surname.

  • Ontario Deaths,1869-1937 and Overseas Deaths, 1939-1947 - Name index of Ontario, Canada, death registration entries & registration entries for 1939-1947 are for overseas deaths only. FamilySearch.
     
  • Ontario Genealogical Society Provincial Index (OGSPI). A hypertext library established in 1997 as a volunteer project to index an unlimited range of genealogical information on Ontario families.

  • Ontario Marriages, 1800-1910 - Index to selected Ontario marriages. Only a few localities are included and the time period varies by locality. FamilySearch.

  • Ontario Marriages, 1869-1927 - Index to marriage records from Ontario, Canada. Ontario Registrar General. Ontario Marriages, 1869-1927. Library and Archives Canada, Ottowa, Canada. FamilySearch.
     
  • Our Roots - A Gateway to Canada's Past. Tales to be discovered include those of the Irish at Grosse Isle, the American invasion of 1775, the Sackville telephone exchange and much more.
     
  • Our Roots - Introduction to Local Histories. this site promotes and feeds a strong national appetite for the history of Canada’s cities, towns and regions.
     
  • Pier 21 -- Canada's Immigration Museum. By the Pier 21 Society of Halifax. Their database includes people who entered Canada through New York, Boston, Providence (Rhode Island), Montreal, Quebec City, North Sydney (Nova Scotia), Vancouver, and Victoria.

  • Prince Edward Island Baptism Card Index, 1721-1885 - Browsable images of index cards to baptismal records. FamilySearch.

  • Prince Edward Island Death Card Index, 1721-1905 - Images of index cards. Information comes from various sources, newspapers, cemeteries, churches, etc. FamilySearch.

  • Prince Edward Island Marriage Registers, 1832-1888 - Images of indexes and registers. Marriages took place in churches and before Justices of the Peace. Dates of indexes correspond to dates of marriages, and marriage records are arranged by date of registration so the dates of the indexes and the marriage records do not always match. Indexes are alphabetized by first letter of the surname only. In some indexes, the "Mc" and "Mac" names are indexed by the first letter after "Mc" or "Mac". FamilySearch.
     
  • Prince Edward Island Public Archives and Record Office Online Database.

  • Le Porgramme de rescherch en demographie historique (PRDH). This site (French-Canadian Genealogy) holds an exhaustive and comprehensive collection of hyper-linked individual, couple, and family compilation records, and transcribed parish certificates for births, marriages, and burials, complete from the founding through the end of the French colonization period and up to about 1780.
     
  • Punch, Terrence. Erin's Sons: Irish Arrivals in Atlantic Canada, 1761-1853. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2008. Contains transcriptions of records of Irish arrivals in Atlantic Canada (Newfoundland, Labrador, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia) from 1761 to 1853 and includes sources such as passenger ship lists, census records, newspaper articles, regimental records, church records, prison records, burials, and tombstone inscriptions. A bibliography and surname index round out the book.

  • Punch, Terrence M. Genealogical Research in Nova Scotia. 3d edition. Halifax: Petheric Press, 1985.
     
  • Punch, Terrence M., and George F. Sanborn Jr., eds. Genealogists' Handbook for Atlantic Canada Research. 2d edition. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1997.

  • Quebec Births and Baptisms, 1662-1898 - Index to selected Quebec births and baptisms. Only a few localities are included and the time period varies by locality. FamilySearch.

  • Quebec, Catholic Parish Registers, 1621-1900 - Images of Catholic parish registers of baptisms, marriages and burials. Also includes some index entries for Montréal and Trois-Rivières. FamilySearch.
     
  • Ramirez, Bruno. Crossing the 49th Parallel: Migration from Canada to the United States, 1900-1930. Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press, 2001.
     
  • Register of Chinese Immigration - Port of New Westminster. This set of records (Library and Archives Canada RG 76, Volume 693) comprises a register of Chinese immigrants who arrived at the Port of New Westminster, B.C. The migrants entered mainly between June 14, 1887 and February 28, 1898, although there is one individual entry from 1907 (no. 428) and two from 1908 (nos. 429-430).

  • Reid, Judith P. Genealogical Research in England's Public Record Office: A Guide for North Americans. Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1996.
     
  • Rootsweb.com. The WorldConnect Project main page can prove very interesting to Canadian family tree researchers.
     
  • Saskatchewan Genealogical Society.
     
  • Saskatchewan Homestead Index Project (SHIP). More than 360,000 names of individuals that were involved in homesteading from 1870-1930. Created by the Canadian Federal Department of the Interior.
     
  • Schecter, Jack. "Migration of Canadians to the United States." Everton's Genealogical Helper. 60, 2 (March/April 2006) p. 41-47.

  • Second World War Service Files: Canadian Armed Forces War Dead. Through this online database, researchers can access references to the service files in the Department of National Defence Fonds (RG 24) for the members of the Canadian Armed Forces who lost their lives during this conflict. Over 1,159,000 men and women served in the Canadian Armed Forces during the Second World War (1939-1945) and 44,093 people lost their lives.
     
  • Tanguay, Cyprien. Dictionnaire Généalogique des famille Canadiennes-françaises, depuis la fondation de la colonie jusqu'à nos jours, 1608-1760. Quintin Publications. Edition 1996. Québec City, reprint in seven volumes, originally published 1871-1890.  Genealogical dictionary.
     
  • Taylor, Ryan. Books You Need to Do Genealogy in Ontario: An Annotated Bibliography. Fort Wayne, Indiana: Round Tower Books, 1996.
     
  • That's My Family. The federated search engine offered on this page was launched and is maintained by Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec (BAnQ). Library and Archives Canada (LAC) partners with BAnQ to oversee the evolution of this project which is also supported by the Council of Provincial and Territorial Archivists (CPTA) of Canada. The search tool, free of charge and available in French and in English, leads to genealogy and family history databases hosted by federal, provincial or territorial archives centres and libraries, or by other partners.
     
  • Upper Canada and Canada West Naturalization Records (1828-1850). Before 1947, foreigners could petition for naturalization. Library and Archives Canada holds several naturalization registers for Upper Canada/Canada West (now Ontario), for the years 1828 to 1850 only, organized by year within each county. This research tool contains 3,344 references.
     
  • Ward Chipman Paers. Ward Chipman the Elder, (1754-1824), a Massachusetts lawyer, was also an army administrator in the State of New York between 1777 and 1783. In 1784, he settled in New Brunswick, where he served as solicitor general until 1808. The Ward Chipman Papers contain muster rolls of Loyalists, and their families, who were members of demobilized regiments and who settled in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. This research tool provides access to nearly 19,000 references to Loyalist families.
     
  • Who Wants to Be an Canadian Genealogist - Quiz - Test Your Knowledge of Genealogy in Canada.  From About.com genealogy section.

  • Wilkinson, Margaret Ann. Genealogy and the Law in Canada. Toronto, Ontario: Dundurn Press, 2010. Goal is to throw light on genealogical methods and material under the purview of Canadian laws, specifically those acts governing privacy, personal data protection, copyright, libel, and information pertaining to cemeteries.