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Genealogy Resources

Nebraska Genealogy Resources

Many were lured to Nebraska by free and inexpensive land under the Homestead Act of 1862. While some families moved on, many others established families who remain there today. The major wagon train trails all passed through Nebraska.

  • Coleman, Ruby Roberts. Genealogical Research in Nebraska. Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Pub. Co, 2011.

  • Coleman, Ruby Roberts. A Research Guide to Genealogical Data in Lincoln County, Nebraska. [Omaha, Neb.]: Nebraska State Genealogical Society, 1984.

  • History of Bancroft, Nebraska, 1884-1984. Dallas, Texas: National ShareGraphics, 1984.

  • Homestead National Monument of America. In Beatrice. The Homestead Act of 1862 was one of the most significant and enduring events in the westward expansion of the United States. By granting free land to claimants, it allowed nearly any man or woman a chance to live the American dream of owning their own land. Visit the park and gain understanding on how the Act changed the lives of all Americans and the land.
     
  • Nebraska, Broken Bow Homestead Records, 1890-1908. 1,824 Homestead Land Entry Case Files of the Broken Bow Land Office, 1890–1908, consisting of unbound documents that include final certificates, applications with land descriptions, affidavits showing proof of citizenship, Register and Receiver receipts, notices and final proofs, and testimonies of witnesses. The files were arranged chronologically and assigned a final certificate number. NARA publication title: Land Entry Case Files of the Broken Bow Land Office, Broken Bow, Nebraska: Homestead Final Certificates, 1890-1908 (NARA M1915). Index courtesy of Fold3.com. FamilySearch.

  • Nebraska, Civil War Service Records of Union Soldiers, 1861-1865. Union service records of soldiers who served in organizations from the Territory of Nebraska. The records include a jacket-envelope for each soldier, labeled with his name, his rank, and the unit in which he served. The jacket-envelope typically contains card abstracts of entries relating to the soldier as found in original muster rolls, returns, rosters, payrolls, appointment books, hospital registers, prison registers and rolls, parole rolls, inspection reports; and the originals of any papers relating solely to the particular soldier. For each military unit the service records are arranged alphabetically by the soldier's surname. The Military Unit field may also display the surname range (A-G) as found on the microfilm. This collection is a part of RG 94, Records of the Adjutant General's Office, 1780's-1917 and is National Archive Microfilm Publication M1787. Index courtesy of Fold3. FamilySearch.

  • Nebraska GenWeb Project.

  • Nebraska, Marriages, 1855-1995. Name index to marriage records from the state of Nebraska. Microfilm copies of these records are available at the Family History Library and Family History Centers. Due to privacy laws, recent records may not be displayed. The year range represents most of the records. A few records may be earlier or later.  FamilySearch.

  • Nebraska Memories. Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. Nebraska Memories is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission.
     
  • Nebraska State/Federal Census: 1885. Microfilm of originals located at the National Archives Branch, Kansas City, Missouri. Filmed by NARA, 1961, 56 rolls, beginning with FHL film #499529.
     
  • Nebraska State/Federal Census: 1885 (Online at RootsWeb and Ancestry--Ancestry includes every-name index).
     
  • Nebraska State Historical Society.

  • Nebraska State Historical Society: Government Records.
     
  • Nebraska Territory and State Censuses: 1854-1869. Nebraska territorial & state census extractions published in the journal of the Nebraska Genealogical Society, "Nebraska and Midwest Genealogical Record", Volumes 9 - 22. You will find a small number of Federal mortality schedules that were published in the same journal at the end of the list.